Nov 29, 2022  
Undergraduate Catalog 2021-2022 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2021-2022 Archived Catalog

Course Descriptions


Course offerings are numbered utilizing four digits, the first indicating college year and the last the number of semester hours credit.

Courses numbered 0001 to 0999 are considered remedial; hours do not count toward minimum requirements for graduation.

Courses numbered 3001 to 4999 fulfill requirements for upper-division credits. Most of these courses have specified prerequisites.

Courses numbered 5000 to 8999 fulfill requirements for graduate credit. Most of these courses have specified prerequisites.

A prerequisite course must have been completed with an acceptable passing grade before enrollment in the given course is permitted.

A corequisite is a course in which a student must be enrolled and satisfactorily participating concurrently with the given course.

 

Nursing

  
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    NUR 4226 Clinical Capstone in Nursing

    Six hours (On Campus)
    Course consists of 240 hours of precepted clinical experience designed to aid the student into transition to practice and stresses the acquisition of the professional nurse identity. Students care for patients within acute care settings. Must be taken in the final semester of the program of study. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisites: NUR 4124  and NUR 4134 
    Corequisite: NUR 4224  
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    NUR 4233 Concepts of Nursing Leadership

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Expands upon the theories and principles of leadership and professional nursing practice within the healthcare system. Focuses on the skills and characteristics needed to lead professional nursing practice in complex healthcare environments. Social issues, economic policy and regulatory requirements are used to explore healthcare delivery systems and access, quality improvement and patient safety initiatives. Includes strategies for monitoring delivery of care, outcomes and evaluating effectiveness of nursing care. Considers the perspectives of leadership, organization and change theories.

    Corequisites: NUR 4124  and NUR 4134 
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    NUR 4481 Selected Topics

    One hour (On Campus)
    Topics are chosen from a specialized area of healthcare, with application or relevance to nursing or allied health professionals. May be repeated for credit when content/topic differs.  An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: senior standing or instructor consent
    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    NUR 4482 Selected Topics

    Two hours (On Campus)
    Topics are chosen from a specialized area of healthcare, with application or relevance to nursing or allied health professionals. May be repeated for credit when content/topic differs.  An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: senior standing or instructor consent
    Offered on campus upon sufficient request

Organizational Leadership

  
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    OL 4123 Leading and Managing Organizational Change

    Three hours (Online)
    This course explores leadership traits, styles, roles and responsibilities of successful leaders over time. This course seeks to determine the students’ individual leadership style and to promote the development of the servant leadership approach modeled by Christ. The course also deals with the practical issues of leading organizations through change and managing the day-to-day aspects of organizational change.

    Offered online Fall B and Spring B terms

  
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    OL 4323 Leading Teams and Coalition Building

    Three hours (Online)
    This course will provide students the opportunity to further develop their leadership skills as they apply to a variety of business settings. Emphasis will be placed on synthesis, analysis, and application of leadership theories in a variety of simulations and cases as encountered by leaders in today’s organizations.

    Offered online Fall A and Spring A terms


Outdoor Leadership Ministries

  
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    OLM 2101 Leave No Trace

    One hour (On Campus)
    Students learn the concept of Leave No Trace and prepare to teach Leave No Trace curriculum in a variety of settings - such as schools, camps, parks, wilderness and front country areas. Workshop topics include the underlying ethics and seven principles of Leave No Trace. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    OLM 2201 Kayaking

    One hour (On Campus)
    Instruction to prepare students for leadership roles in conducting kayaking experience in camps, adventure programs and other wilderness settings. Students gain and demonstrate an understanding of necessary kayaking equipment, trip planning and organization, instruction of basic kayaking strokes, implementation of safety procedures, kayak expedition skills and group management on kayak expeditions. Field trips required. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    OLM 2211 Environmental Science Educator

    One hour (On Campus)
    Introduces students to various career opportunities and the basic skills needed for each, in the area of natural resource management and environmental education. Students will develop awareness, knowledge, skills and commitment to informed decisions and responsible behavior concerning how to manage natural resources and educate others toward constructive actions concerning the environment. The completion of the Project WET, WILD and Learning Tree Workshops and interaction with various government agencies which manage natural resources will be an integral part of this course.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    OLM 2212 Leadership and Human Systems

    Two hours (On Campus)
    Examines the leadership practices necessary to develop processes, context, and culture to promote effective teams. Identifies how to integrate Christian worldview and the use of power in human systems.

    Offered on campus Spring semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    OLM 2283 Outdoor Recreation Skills

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Advanced training in skills essential for an effective camp/recreation career. Students are exposed to outdoor recreational activities such as riflery, archery, low and high ropes course, backpacking, hiking, swimming, canoeing and horseback riding. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    OLM 2301 Canoeing

    One hour (On Campus)
    Instruction to prepare students for leadership roles in conducting canoeing experiences in camps, adventure programs, and other wilderness settings. Students gain and demonstrate an understanding of necessary canoeing equipment, trip planning and organization, instruction of basic canoeing strokes, implementation of safety procedures, canoe expedition skills and group management on canoe expeditions. Field trips required. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    OLM 2311 Wilderness First Aid

    One hour (On Campus)
    Training course on first aid practices specifically used in remote or wilderness settings. Topics may include: Primary and Secondary Assessments, Head/Brain, Neck and Spinal Injuries, Heat-Related Emergencies, Hypothermia, Altitude-Related Illnesses, Allergies and Anaphylaxis, Burns, Bone and Joint Injuries, and Wounds and Wound Infection.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    OLM 2373 Principles and Practices of Experiential Education

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Theories and principles of leadership and experiential education (e.g. transfer of learning, small group development, debriefing/processing, providing appropriate feedback, therapeutic approaches, framing experiences) are applied to program development and implementation for Christian outdoor ministry settings, with special consideration of both traditional and specific populations (e.g. youth-at-risk, chemical dependency, businesses, university orientation programs). Opportunities to develop, lead and evaluate adventure education experiences are incorporated. Field trips required.

    Offered on campus Fall semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    OLM 2383 Outdoor Living Skills

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Introduction to basic living skills in wilderness environments. This course has a high level of hands-on activity, including a backpacking trip focused on skills such as Leave No Trace principles, appropriate clothing, water purification, stoves, fire building, navigation, meal planning and preparation, and trip planning. Field trip required. This course is a qualifying course for trip leaders who work with JBU’s Outdoor Adventure Center. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    OLM 2401 Mountain Biking Level 1

    One hour (On Campus)
    Training to teach students the basic skills of mountain biking and the ability to teach and assess others in safety and riding skills on progressively more difficult terrain.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    OLM 2411 Mountain Biking Level 2

    One hour (On Campus)
    Training to teach students the advanced skills of mountain biking and the ability to teach and assess others in safety and riding skills on progressively more difficult terrain.

    Prerequisite: OLM 2401  
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    OLM 2601 Introduction to Top Rope Rock Climbing

    One hour (On Campus)
    Instruction to prepare students for leadership roles in conducting beginning top rope rock climbing experiences in camps, adventure programs and other wilderness settings. Emphasis is placed upon site selection, instructor qualifications, assessment of participant skills, proper use and care of equipment, belaying technique, correct use of anchors, climbing site management, stewardship practices in wilderness settings and ministry opportunities through outdoor adventure pursuits. Field trips required.

    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    OLM 2611 Zip Line Guide

    One hour (On Campus)
    Training course to prepare students to lead zip line experiences as a part of a canopy or zip line tour. Topics may include: platform management, zip line procedures, hand braking, lowering from a platform, risk management, retrievals, trolley transfer and braking systems.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    OLM 2701 Ropes Course Level 1

    One hour (On Campus)
    Entry level training course to prepare students to lead groups using a challenge course. Topics will include equipment use and inspection, leading edge climbing, belaying, knots, course set up, belay transfers, daily course inspection, experiential learning philosophy, basic risk management and rescues. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    OLM 2711 Ropes Course Level 2

    One hour (On Campus)
    Advanced level training course which builds upon the skills and knowledge from Ropes Course Level 1. Topics include: program design, advanced team theory, client assessment, staff supervision and feedback, belay escapes, second level course inspection (does not prepare one to be an inspector), rescues using a 4:1 mechanical systems and review of high impact elements-swings and two rope pamper pole set up.

    Prerequisite: OLM 2701  
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    OLM 2801 Top Rope Climbing Instructor Certification

    One hour (On Campus)
    This course builds on a basic knowledge of top rope rock climbing techniques and will explore practical top rope guiding standards. The course will consist of technical, hands-on top rope rock climbing guide training, discussion of common guide concerns, instructor demonstrations of common guiding and instruction skills presented. Successful completion of the course will lead to Top Rope Guide Certification by PCGI (Professional Climbing Guide Institute). An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: OLM 2601  
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    OLM 2811 Search and Rescue

    One hour (On Campus)
    The introduction to Search and Rescue (ISAR)/SARTECH III course is designed to provide knowledge concerning the general responsibilities, skills, abilities and the equipment needed by persons who would be participating in a search or rescue mission. The course is based around rural and wilderness environments but the material is recommended as a base of knowledge for all SAR environments. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    OLM 2821 Lifeguarding

    One hour (On Campus)
    Skill training course which will lead to certification as a lifeguard. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Offered on campus on a rotating basis
  
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    OLM 2901 Shooting Sports

    One hour (On Campus)
    Training to equip students to safely lead shooting sports such as riflery and skeet shooting in a camp setting. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    OLM 2911 Swift Water Rescue

    One hour (On Campus)
    Training to equip students to assess, plan and execute water rescues in a moving water and white water context. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    OLM 2921 Target Sports

    One hour (On Campus)
    Training to equip students to safely lead and teach target activities including archery, knife throwing and tomahawk throwing.  An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    OLM 3111 Horsemanship

    One hour (On Campus)
    Instruction in teaching horse care, handling and riding techniques to participants of different ages. Safety, stable management and ministry opportunities through involvement in the “Right Lead” program at New Life Ranch are addressed. Field trips required.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    OLM 3113 Leadership and Professional Etiquette

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This course provides an experiential assessment of each student’s leadership tendencies and aptitude while also exploring what it means to be a professional in the workplace.

    Offered on campus Fall semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    OLM 3153 Philosophy and Methods of Outdoor Education

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An examination of effective teaching techniques and administrative programming practices for outdoor experiential education. This course emphasizes development and selection of curriculum and activities appropriate for use in extending the academic classroom to the outdoors. Content is also designed to prepare prospective outdoor education professionals to teach about the outdoor environment in non-formal educational settings. Opportunities to develop, lead and evaluate outdoor education experience are incorporated.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    OLM 3213 Camp Leadership and Management

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An introduction to the philosophy of Christian camping and its place in the spiritual, emotional and educational development of the person. Attention is given to administration and organization of camp life from counselor training to food purchasing. A local camp, New Life Ranch, hosts the course and serves as a model for observation and learning.

    Offered on campus Spring semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    OLM 3222 Strategies and Methods for Staff Development

    Two hours (On Campus)
    This course examines the processes and methods for creating a context and culture to effectively foster development and learning of all members of an organization.

    Offered on campus Fall semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    OLM 3243 Facilitating Experience-based Discipleship

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Exploring the development of disciples utilizing the unique, experiential context of the outdoors and adventure activities. This is a master facilitator course that allows students to deeply explore the design and delivery of learning experiences with the purpose of holistic development of mature people with an active faith.

    Prerequisites: CMF 2263  and OLM 2373  
    Offered on campus Spring semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    OLM 4111 Wilderness EMT Bridge Class

    One hour (On Campus)
    The WEMT course builds on EMT training and expertise to meet the special challenges of the remote and unconventional environment. This course upgrades the EMT certificate to a WEMT certification requirements.  An additional fee covers the cost of certification for Wilderness EMT training. 

    Prerequisites: EMTA 1004 EMT Basic Emergency Medical Technician I (NWACC) and EMTA 2004 EMT Emergency Medical Technician II (NWACC)
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    OLM 4121 Wilderness First Responder

    One hour (On Campus)
    Standards of practice for outdoor professionals providing emergency medical care in remote areas. Consideration of prolonged transport times, severe environments, and the use of portable and improvised equipment. Topics include wilderness trauma and illness, search and rescue operations, and environmental emergencies. Upon successful completion of practical and written exams, students will receive a two-year Wilderness First Responder certificate from Wilderness Medicine Institute of National Outdoor Leadership Schools (NOLS) and a two-year American Heart Association Adult Heartsaver CPR Certification.  An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    OLM 4243 Senior Seminar

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A senior seminar in which students prepare to transition into the workforce and/or graduate studies. Students will learn to discern vocational direction, prepare professional documents such as resumes and portfolio’s, interviewing, develop skills and knowledge to manage life after college, explore family dynamics associated with choosing one’s first job, and prepare strategies to continue personal and professional growth in the future. Same as ICS 4243 

    Prerequisites: junior standing and ICS or OLM majors only
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    OLM 4481 Selected Topics

    One hour (On Campus)
    Topics are chosen from some area of Outdoor Leadership Ministries. The student may also do an independent study and research under the supervision of the instructor. May be repeated for credit when content differs. An additional fee may be associated with some OLM certifications.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    OLM 4482 Selected Topics

    Two hours (On Campus)
    Topics are chosen from some area of Outdoor Leadership Ministries. The student may also do an independent study and research under the supervision of the instructor. May be repeated for credit when content differs. An additional fee may be associated with some OLM certifications.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    OLM 4483 Selected Topics

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Topics are chosen from some area of Outdoor Leadership Ministries. The student may also do an independent study and research under the supervision of the instructor. May be repeated for credit when content differs. An additional fee may be associated with some OLM certifications.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    OLM 4610 Internship in Outdoor Leadership Ministries

    No credit (On Campus)
    Participation in an approved and supervised local or international ministry activity. May be repeated. Graded ’S’ or ‘U’. 

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    OLM 4611 Internship in Outdoor Leadership Ministries

    One hour (On Campus)
    Participation in an approved and supervised local or international ministry activity. May be repeated for credit as needed to fulfill necessary requirements. Graded: ‘S’ or ‘U’. 

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    OLM 4612 Internship in Outdoor Leadership Ministries

    Two hours (On Campus)
    Participation in an approved and supervised local or international ministry activity. May be repeated for credit as needed to fulfill necessary requirements. Graded: ‘S’ or ‘U’. 

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    OLM 4613 Internship in Outdoor Leadership Ministries

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Participation in an approved and supervised local or international ministry activity. May be repeated for credit as needed to fulfill necessary requirements. Graded: ‘S’ or ‘U’. 

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    OLM 4614 Internship in Outdoor Leadership Ministries

    Four hours (On Campus)
    Participation in an approved and supervised local or international ministry activity. May be repeated for credit as needed to fulfill necessary requirements. Graded: ‘S’ or ‘U’. 

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters

Philosophy, Politics and Economics

  
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    PPE 2113 Philosophy, Politics and Economics I

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) I examines central questions in the human experience at the intersection of these three important fields of study. The course promotes cross-disciplinary discussions about key texts and historical figures from the earliest civilizations to the early modern era. Far from being an arbitrary amalgamation of disparate fields, PPE recognizes the rich tradition of major thinkers who were philosophers, political theorists and economists all at once. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement or the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum (cannot meet both core requirements).

    Offered on campus Fall semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    PPE 2133 Philosophy, Politics and Economics II

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) II examines central questions in the human experience at the intersection of these three important fields of study. The course promotes cross-disciplinary discussions about key texts and historical figures from the early modern era to the present. Far from being an arbitrary amalgamation of disparate fields, PPE recognizes the rich tradition of major thinkers who were philosophers, political theorists and economists all at once. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement or the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum (cannot meet both core requirements).

    Offered on campus Spring semester (odd-numbered years)

Physics

  
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    PHY 1101 Physics Practicum

    One hour (On Campus)
    Experiences in physics, such as: physics teaching, physics demonstration design and implementation, or laboratory design and implementation. May be repeated for credit. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    PHY 1114 Fundamentals of Physics I

    Four hours (On Campus)
    An introductory study of the principles of Newtonian mechanics, vibrations, waves, and sound. Primarily for Biology, Construction Management, and Kinesiology majors. Three hours lecture-discussion and one two-hour laboratory period per week. Meets the Natural Science requirement of the Core Curriculum. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisites: minimum ACT math score of 24, or minimum SAT math score of 580, or CLT math score of at least 21, or MTH 1113  and MTH 1122  
    Corequisite: PHY 1114L
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    PHY 1124 Fundamentals of Physics II

    Four hours (On Campus)
    An introductory study of the principles of thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, and optics. Primarily for Biology, Construction Management, and Kinesiology majors. Three hours lecture-discussion and one two-hour laboratory per week. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: PHY 1114  
    Corequisite: PHY 1124L
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    PHY 2101 Physics Practicum

    One hour (On Campus)
    Experiences in physics, such as: physics teaching, physics demonstration design and implementation, or laboratory design and implementation. May be repeated for credit. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    PHY 2114 General Physics I

    Four hours (On Campus)
    A study of the principles of Newtonian mechanics, vibrations, fluids, waves, and sound. Primarily for Biochemistry, Chemistry, and Engineering majors. Three hours lecture-discussion and one two-hour laboratory per week. Meets the Natural Science requirement of the Core Curriculum. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: MTH 1134  
    Corequisite: PHY 2114L
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    PHY 2124 General Physics II

    Four hours (On Campus)
    A study of the principles of thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, and optics. Primarily for Biochemistry, Chemistry, and Engineering majors. Three hours lecture-discussion and one two-hour laboratory per week. Meets the Natural Science requirement of the Core Curriculum. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: PHY 2114  
    Corequisite: PHY 2124L
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    PHY 3101 Physics Practicum

    One hour (On Campus)
    Experiences in physics, such as: physics teaching, physics demonstration design and implementation, or laboratory design and implementation. May be repeated for credit. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    PHY 3113 Thermal Sciences

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An introduction to the thermal sciences of mechanical engineering providing an overview of thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, and heat transfer. Three hours lecture-discussion per week. Same as ME 3113 

    Prerequisite: MTH 1144 
    Prerequisite or corequisite: PHY 2114 
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    PHY 3171 Selected Topics

    One hour (On Campus)
    Topics chosen from the many branches of physics such as optics, acoustics, nuclear physics, relativity, quantum physics, astronomy, and theoretical physics. May be repeated for credit when content differs.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    PHY 3172 Selected Topics

    Two hours (On Campus)
    Topics chosen from the many branches of physics such as optics, acoustics, nuclear physics, relativity, quantum physics, astronomy, and theoretical physics. May be repeated for credit when content differs.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    PHY 3173 Selected Topics

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Topics chosen from the many branches of physics such as optics, acoustics, nuclear physics, relativity, quantum physics, astronomy, and theoretical physics. May be repeated for credit when content differs.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    PHY 3223 Thermodynamics

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A continuation from ME 3113  or PHY 3113  of the study of the laws of classical thermodynamics with a brief introduction to compressible flow. Energy conservation in closed and flowing systems. Application to power and refrigeration cycles. Three hours lecture-discussion per week. Same as ME 3223 

    Prerequisite: ME 3113  or PHY 3113  
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    PHY 4101 Physics Practicum

    One hour (On Campus)
    Experiences in physics, such as: physics teaching, physics demonstration design and implementation, or laboratory design and implementation. May be repeated for credit. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    PHY 4123 Electromagnetics

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Application of Maxwell’s equations to transmission lines, waveguides, and antennas. Include antenna design. Three hours lecture-discussion per week. Same as EE 4123 

    Prerequisites: MTH 2123  and PHY 2124  
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    PHY 4220 Physics Research

    No credit (On Campus)
    Laboratory-based research projects in an area of Physics of interest to the student and supervising faculty. PHY 4220 is only for REU experiences at other institutions. May be repeated. Graded ‘S’ or ‘U’.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    PHY 4221 Physics Research

    One hour (On Campus)
    Laboratory-based research projects in an area of Physics of interest to the student and supervising faculty. May be repeated for credit.  An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    PHY 4222 Physics Research

    Two hours (On Campus)
    Laboratory-based research projects in an area of Physics of interest to the student and supervising faculty. May be repeated for credit.  An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    PHY 4223 Physics Research

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Laboratory-based research projects in an area of Physics of interest to the student and supervising faculty. May be repeated for credit.  An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    PHY 4310 Physics Internship

    No credit (On Campus)
    Practical experience in a Physics-related field through work in industry, a non-profit organization, or a government agency. Internships may be paid, unpaid, or stipend-based. Graded ‘S’ or ‘U’.

    Prerequisite: junior standing
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters

Political Science

  
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    POL 1013 American Government and Politics

    Three hours (On Campus and Online)
    A study of the origins, purposes, and evolution of the American system of government and politics. Topics include the U.S. Constitution, federalism, voting behavior, political parties and elections, and the separation of powers. Students are asked to wrestle with what it means for Christians to engage government and politics. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
    Offered online Fall B term

  
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    POL 2170 Model United Nations

    No credit (On Campus)
    This course prepares students for participation in the Midwest Model United Nations conference, held in St. Louis, Missouri every February. Students conduct research in support of the class’s assigned country, focusing on specific topics and broader interests. Students also author position papers for submission to the conference, either individually or in pairs. May be repeated.

    Prerequisite: instructor consent
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    POL 2171 Model United Nations

    One hour (On Campus)
    This course prepares students for participation in the Midwest Model United Nations conference, held in St. Louis, Missouri every February. Students conduct research in support of the class’s assigned country, focusing on specific topics and broader interests. Students also author position papers for submission to the conference, either individually or in pairs. May be repeated for credit when content differs.

    Prerequisite: instructor consent
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    POL 2213 Comparative Politics

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A comparative study of major political systems focusing on the principles, institutions, and customs that constitute the various regimes of the world. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Spring semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    POL 3003 Political Philosophy

    Three hours (On Campus and Online)
    A study of ancient and modern political philosophies, utilizing primary texts. The course addresses the place of political philosophy in the broader field of philosophy, emphasizing a worldview approach as a means of understanding human existence. Topics include nature, reason, freedom, justice, political rights, property, law, religion, will, passions, power, customs, and community. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum. Same as RPH 3013 

    Prerequisite: EGL 1023  or EGL 1093  
    Offered on campus Spring semester
    Offered online Spring B term

  
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    POL 3163 Law, Courts, and Politics

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An examination of the relationship between law, courts, and politics in American society. Students will become familiar with competing theories on the origins of law, and how these theories explain contemporary understandings of law. Students also study the American legal system and profession, the structure and limits of the federal and state courts, and consider the intersection of law, politics, and society in specific substantive areas. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite: POL 1013 
    Offered on campus Spring semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    POL 3173 Congress and the American Presidency

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of the relationship between the legislative and executive branches in American government, with a specific focus on Congress and the president. Students will explore this relationship over time in an effort to understand how each branch works with (and against) the other. Time will be spent on the legislative and regulatory processes, the delegation of power from Congress to the president, the advice and consent power of the Senate concerning presidential appointments, the powers of each to check the other, and more. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum. 

    Prerequisite: POL 1013 
    Offered on campus Spring semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    POL 3213 Religion and Politics

    Three hours (On Campus and Online)
    An exploration of the intersection of religion and politics in the United States. Topics include distinctions between religious traditions as they pertain to political behavior, the role of religious interest groups in American politics, church-state disputes and controversies, and increasing secularization in the United States. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Spring semester (odd-numbered years)
    Offered online Fall A, Spring A, and Summer A terms

  
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    POL 3253 Politics and Race in America

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of race in American politics. Topics include the role of race in American political institutions over time, race and political behavior, race and the law, and more. Students are challenged to think about these issues from a Christian perspective. Meets the Intercultural Engagement requirement or the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum (cannot meet both core requirements).

    Offered on campus Fall semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    POL 3353 International Relations

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An examination of the development of international relations and international organizations, and how Christians have responded to the issues of war and peace. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisites: POL 1013  and either HST 2013 , HST 2083 HST 2023 , or HST 2093 
    Offered on campus Spring semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    POL 3393 Research Methods and Design

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An introduction to the research process in Political Science. Explores key debates over research methods and techniques, including casual inference, hypothesis testing, case studies, quantitative versus qualitative research, and more. Students produce and defend an original research design that could be developed into a full-fledged research project. 

    Offered on campus Fall semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    POL 3453 Gender in American Politics

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This course studies the relationship between gender and politics in the United States. Specific topics include the gender gap in voting, representation in government, legal and constitutional developments related to sex and gender, the influence of gender on political campaigns, and more. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Fall semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    POL 4213 Constitutional Law: Institutions and Powers

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A seminar on the origin, development, and contemporary practice of American constitutionalism as expressed through interpretations of the U.S. Constitution, with special emphasis on Supreme Court cases dealing with federalism, Congress, the Presidency, and the courts. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum. 

    Offered on campus Fall semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    POL 4223 Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A seminar on the origin, development, and contemporary practice of American constitutionalism as expressed through interpretations of the U.S. Constitution, with special emphasis on Supreme Court cases dealing with the Bill of Rights and the 14th Amendment. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Fall semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    POL 4511 Independent Study in Political Science

    One hour (On Campus)
    Special topics in political science are considered.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    POL 4512 Independent Study in Political Science

    Two hours (On Campus)
    Special topics in political science are considered.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    POL 4513 Independent Study in Political Science

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Special topics in political science are considered.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    POL 4613 Research Seminar

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An overview of political science as a discipline, covering different approaches to political science research. Students research a topic of interest to them in political science, culminating with a paper and presentation to the JBU community. Students also consider possible career paths in political science, and reflect on what it means to be a Christian citizen in a fallen world.

    Prerequisites: POL 3393  and nine additional hours of Political Science
    Offered on campus Spring semester (even-numbered years)

Psychology

  
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    PSY 1013 Introductory Psychology

    Three hours (On Campus and Online)
    The scientific study of human behavior and mental processes including the brain and behavior, consciousness, learning and memory, development, sociocultural processes, emotions, stress and health responses, psychopathology, and treatment methods in psychological science. Students are introduced to theory, research, and practice as the foundations of modern psychology. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
    Offered online Fall A and Spring A terms

  
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    PSY 1093 Honors: Introductory Psychology

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A scientific study of the principles underlying animal and human behavior, focusing on the development of psychology in relation to other academic disciplines. Critical thinking and integrative themes are stressed by using in-class exercises and formal projects. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program or Honors Committee approval
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    PSY 1101 Orientation to Psychology

    One hour (On Campus and Online)
    Designed to help students develop the knowledge and skills that will enable them to make intelligent choices about their future in the discipline. Topics for discussion include the changing nature of psychology, departmental resources and goals, career development, and graduate studies. Not required of majors who upon matriculation to JBU have completed more than 12 transferable hours in psychology.

    Offered on campus Fall semester
    Offered online Fall A, Spring A, and Summer A terms

  
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    PSY 2123 Psychology of Relationship Development

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A foundational course that integrates Biblical truths with current literature on interpersonal, marriage, and familial relationships across the lifespan. Course work includes analysis and application of current theory and research on interpersonal neurobiology, emotional and relational intelligence, gender differences, family of origin issues, human sexuality, personality types, communication skills, and cross-cultural relationships. This course may not be audited. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    PSY 2233 Theories of Counseling

    Three hours (On Campus and Online)
    A study of major counseling theories. Includes dynamic, existential, humanistic, gestalt, cognitive-behavioral, reality, and family systems theories of counseling and the most useful strategies from each. 

    Prerequisite: PSY 1013  
    Offered on campus Fall semester
    Offered online Spring B and Summer A terms

  
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    PSY 2243 Introduction to Therapeutic Interviewing

    Three hours (On Campus and Online)
    Basic elements of interviewing, setting conditions for psychological growth, and the development of effective action plans for healthy psychological change.

    Prerequisite: PSY 1013 
    Offered on campus Spring semester
    Offered online Spring A term

  
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    PSY 2383 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

    Three hours (On Campus and Online)
    A study of the essential statistical techniques needed to analyze experimental data and understand current research publications with applications in the social and behavioral sciences. Topics include graphing, descriptive statistics, inferential statistics and hypothesis testing (using correlation, regression, t-tests, ANOVA, and chi square). Extensive use of statistical software for both calculation and enhancing conceptual understanding and critical thinking. Meets the Mathematics requirement or the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum (cannot meet both core requirements).

    Prerequisites: PSY 1013  and either a minimum ACT math score of 19, or minimum SAT math score of 510, or CLT math score of at least 18, or MTH 0153  
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
    Offered online Fall A, Spring A, and Summer A terms

  
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    PSY 2393 Research Methods

    Three hours (On Campus and Online)
    An introduction to research methods in psychology that stresses critical thinking about methodological issues. Research skills are developed in hypothesis construction, research design, interpretation of statistical results, scientific writing, library and internet research, and presentation of results to a professional audience.

    Prerequisite: PSY 1013  or PSY 1093 
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: PSY 2383  or MTH 1003  
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
    Offered online Fall B and Spring B terms

  
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    PSY 2413 Developmental Psychology

    Three hours (On Campus and Online)
    A study of the physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development of the human from conception through adulthood. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum. Same as FAM 2413 

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
    Offered online Fall B, Spring B, and Summer B terms

  
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    PSY 3203 Psychological Testing

    Three hours (On Campus and Online)
    An examination of the theory, interpretation, and appropriate use of individual and group tests of personality, mental ability, aptitude, achievement, and interest. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite: PSY 2383  
    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
    Offered online Fall A and Spring A terms

  
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    PSY 3303 Theories of Personality

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of the development, organization, and dynamics of personality with references to theories of personality developed in the 20th century. This course examines personality theory through a focus on key concepts, techniques of practice, application, and critical evaluation of each framework. The application of personality theories in clinical and testing settings will also be explored. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite: PSY 1013  or PSY 1093 
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    PSY 3333 Sport and Exercise Psychology

    Three hours (On Campus)
    The study of the psychological processes which underlie involvement in sport and exercise activities. Focus will be given to issues of performance, motivation and aggression, interventions in sport, team and spectator factors, and socialization in sport, among others. An elective course which may be substituted for the Selected Topics course. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum. Same as KIN 3333 

    Prerequisite: PSY 1013  or PSY 1093  
    Offered on campus Spring semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    PSY 3411 Selected Topics

    One hour (On Campus)
    Topics chosen from a variety of subjects such as the Psychology of Genius and Creativity, the Psychology and History of the Holocaust, and Psychology of Humor, among other specialty areas. May be repeated for credit when content/topic differs. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite or corequisite: PSY 1013  
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    PSY 3412 Selected Topics

    Two hours (On Campus)
    Topics chosen from a variety of subjects such as the Psychology of Genius and Creativity, the Psychology and History of the Holocaust, and Psychology of Humor, among other specialty areas. May be repeated for credit when content/topic differs. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite or corequisite: PSY 1013  
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    PSY 3413 Selected Topics

    Three hours (On Campus and Online)
    Topics chosen from a variety of subjects such as the Psychology of Genius and Creativity, the Psychology and History of the Holocaust, and Psychology of Humor, among other specialty areas. May be repeated for credit when content/topic differs. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite or corequisite: PSY 1013  
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
    Offered online Spring B term

  
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    PSY 3423 Social Psychology

    Three hours (On Campus and Online)
    An investigation of how the behavior, feelings and thoughts of an individual are influenced or determined by the behavior and characteristics of others. Topics for discussion include attraction, attitudes, aggression, persuasion, and group behavior. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite: PSY 1013  or PSY 1093 
    Offered on campus Spring semester
    Offered online Fall B and Summer B terms

  
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    PSY 3493 Research Seminar

    Three hours (On Campus and Online)
    An opportunity for students to develop research skills in a content area with the goal of completing and presenting an empirical research project. Members of the class also produce the departmental online undergraduate research journal. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite: PSY 2393  
    Offered on campus Fall semester
    Offered online Fall A and Spring A terms

 

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