Aug 14, 2022  
Undergraduate Catalog 2021-2022 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2021-2022 Archived Catalog

Course Descriptions


Course offerings are numbered utilizing four digits, the first indicating college year and the last the number of semester hours credit.

Courses numbered 0001 to 0999 are considered remedial; hours do not count toward minimum requirements for graduation.

Courses numbered 3001 to 4999 fulfill requirements for upper-division credits. Most of these courses have specified prerequisites.

Courses numbered 5000 to 8999 fulfill requirements for graduate credit. Most of these courses have specified prerequisites.

A prerequisite course must have been completed with an acceptable passing grade before enrollment in the given course is permitted.

A corequisite is a course in which a student must be enrolled and satisfactorily participating concurrently with the given course.

 

Economics

  
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    ECN 4131 Selected Topics

    One hour (On Campus)
    A study of subjects of special interest. May be offered as independent study under faculty supervision.

    Prerequisite: junior standing
    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    ECN 4132 Selected Topics

    Two hours (On Campus)
    A study of subjects of special interest. May be offered as independent study under faculty supervision.

    Prerequisite: junior standing
    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    ECN 4133 Selected Topics

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of subjects of special interest. May be offered as independent study under faculty supervision.

    Prerequisite: junior standing
    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    ECN 4183 Practicum in Economic Development

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Field experience and training in the practices of economic and community development. May focus on domestic or international development problems. May be primarily policy oriented or project focused.

    Prerequisite: ECN 2123 
    Offered on campus Spring semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    ECN 4413 Economics of Resources and the Environment

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of the allocation of natural resources from a perspective of optimal use and sustainability. Emphasis is placed on market effectiveness, causes of and solutions to market failure, and public policy. This course also addresses the challenges of pollution, population, and economic growth. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite: ECN 2123  
    Offered on campus Spring semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    ECN 4423 Economic Growth and Development

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A survey of the major economic and social challenges facing developing nations. Traditional and contemporary models of growth and development are studied, with an emphasis on the problems related to poverty, population growth, urbanization, health, and education. Consideration is given to the global context for economic development, especially relating to international trade and foreign aid. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite: ECN 2123  
    Offered on campus Fall semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    ECN 4993 Senior Research Project

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Individual, intensive study and presentation of an approved topic. This project is integrative in nature and is to be completed during the student’s final year of study. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite: senior standing
    Offered on campus Spring semester

Education

  
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    ED 1111 Seminar in Education

    One hour (On Campus)
    An overview of the American public education system, JBU Teacher Education programs, and the licensure requirements for an Arkansas standard teacher’s license. A weekly field assignment in a public school classroom is required.

    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    ED 1143 World Regional Geography

    Three hours (On Campus)
    General survey of world regions including a study of geographic factors which underlie strengths of world powers. Meets state requirements for elementary and secondary teachers. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    ED 2033 Cultural Competencies for Human Service Professionals

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Designed as a multidisciplinary course for students in the human service professions. Exposes students to targeted populations within their field of study, at both the individual and organizational levels. Emphasizes improved decision-making and performance in a multi-cultural context, focusing on effective interpersonal communication. Attention is given to behaviors, language, customs, beliefs, and perspectives with the intent to reduce culturally-related disparities within the community and globally. Meets the Intercultural Engagement requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    ED 2143 Learning Theories and Developmental Psychology

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of major learning theories applicable to classroom teaching coordinated with the study of biosocial, cognitive, and psychosocial development of the human from birth through lifespan. Field experience required. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    ED 2213 Curriculum and Instruction Early Childhood

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This course will be a study of curriculum and instruction that will support the cognitive, social, emotional, and physical development of pre-school age children. An emphasis will be placed on lesson design as it pertains to young children and strategies for managing behavior in the classroom.

    Prerequisite or corequisite: ED 2143 
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    ED 2221 Early Childhood Practicum

    One hour (On Campus)
    This course provides an opportunity for the candidates to gain experience in a pre-school setting for a minimum of 15 hours. The candidates will play the role of participant-observer, making focused observations that are intentionally correlated with content learned during curriculum and instruction for early childhood. The Professional Development School Director will set up the placement for the practicum. The course will meet for one hour each week on the JBU campus to discuss and process the experience.

    Prerequisites: ED 2143  and ED 2213 
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    ED 2311 Enhancing Learning Through Physical Activity

    One hour (On Campus)
    This course covers the neuro-scientific, multi-cultural, behavioral and academic benefits of integrating physical education in the classroom, and provides practical ways to bring physical education into teaching practices for improved learning outcomes.  This course addresses the physical education teaching standards which are a part of the Arkansas Department of Education, Elementary Education K-6 Teaching Competencies.

    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    ED 2713 Differentiated Learning

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This course is designed to explore the academic diversity found in elementary and secondary classrooms. Considerable attention is given to instructional strategies that cater to a wide range of learning styles and preferences. Curriculum design, classroom management, assessment and grading practices are also addressed through the lens of supporting diverse learners.

    Prerequisite or corequisite: ED 2143 
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    ED 2723 Special Education

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Examination of the types of exceptionalities in children including those with pervasive cognitive delays, specific learning disabilities, physical impairments, emotional disturbances, and other health impairments. This course covers the legal responsibilities, support systems, and instructional strategies necessary to provide effective instruction for learners in Special Education, including understanding of the IEP process, as well as awareness of students with Section 504 accommodation plans. This includes the self-contained environment and inclusive classroom (co-teaching). Designed to equip candidates to respond to the breadth of learners in Special Education needs within the public school system. Field experience required.

    Prerequisite or corequisite: ED 2143 
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    ED 3113 Framework for Teaching 1 - Secondary Education

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This course focuses on the application of effective planning skills and creating a classroom environment for learning as detailed in Danielson’s Framework for Teaching with an emphasis on Domains 2 and 4. Included are experiences with developing and presenting lessons based upon state standards, establishing learning objectives, creating assessments, and using research-based instructional strategies appropriate for all learners in a secondary education classroom.  Field experience required.

    Prerequisite: ED 2143  
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    ED 3123 Framework for Teaching 1 - Elementary Education

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This course focuses on the application of effective planning skills and creating a classroom environment for learning as detailed in Danielson’s Framework for Teaching with an emphasis on Domains 1 and 3. Included are experiences with developing and presenting lessons based upon state standards, establishing learning objectives, creating assessments, and using research-based instructional strategies appropriate for all learners in an elementary education classroom.  Field experience required.

    Prerequisite: ED 2143  
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    ED 3133 Framework for Teaching 2 - Elementary Education

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This course focuses on the application of classroom management skills and professionalism as detailed in Danielson’s Framework for Teaching Domains 2 and 4. The course includes experiences with developing a positive classroom culture, working with difficult students, reflecting on teaching, working with parents and the community, and professional and ethical behavior in an elementary classroom. Field experience required. 

    Prerequisite: ED 3123  
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    ED 3153 Disciplinary Literacy

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Secondary (7-12) candidates study assessment and instructional strategies designed to facilitate effective teaching of their content as well as the comprehension and effective use of content materials for all students, including ELL’s and those with special needs. Methods are provided whereby candidates might evaluate the appropriateness of content materials and the learning needs of their students. Candidates must collaborate with a peer in developing a detailed, integrated unit that focuses on content instruction and includes learning objectives, appropriate use of teaching strategies, and assessment. Lab and field experiences required.

    Prerequisite: ED 2143 
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    ED 3213 Framework for Teaching 2 - Secondary Education

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This course focuses on the application of classroom management skills and professionalism as detailed in Danielson’s Framework for Teaching Domains 2 and 4. The course includes experiences with developing a positive classroom culture, working with difficult students, reflecting on teaching, working with parents and the community, and professional and ethical behavior in a secondary classroom. Field experience required. 

    Prerequisite: ED 3113 
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    ED 3323 Reading Comprehension for Elementary Teachers (Blk 1)

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Elementary teacher candidates will become familiar with vocabulary development and its importance and role in reading development. Candidates will examine reading comprehension skills and strategies as they relate to imaginative/literary texts as well as informational/expository texts. Candidates will examine the importance of speaking and listening as part of comprehensive reading and language arts instruction through practical presentations, and teaching experiences in the classroom and in the field experience placement. Candidates will demonstrate an understanding of formal and informal methods of reading comprehension assessment and its relationship to instruction through practical teaching experiences both in the classroom and in the field experience placement. Field experience required.

    Prerequisite: ED 2143  
    Corequisite: ED 3333  
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    ED 3333 Teaching Elementary Reading & Language Arts: The Science of Reading

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Elementary candidates will become familiar with various literacy models and the theories that support them. This course provides a balanced overview of instruction and assessment and is designed to encompass both the theoretical and practical aspects of learning how to teach reading with an emphasis on guided reading and Common Core State Standards. Included are studies of the stages of reading development, reading components (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, comprehension, and vocabulary), assessment and technology. Students will also study and apply procedures and methods used in analyzing, diagnosing, and remediating reading difficulties. Embedded field experience focusing on the diagnosis and tutoring of reading difficulties is required. Elementary teacher candidates will become familiar with various theoretical models of reading: The Simple View of Reading, Scarborough’s Reading Rope, The Four Part Mental Processor, and Ehri’s Phases of Word Level Reading. This course will cover the science of reading: examining how the brain learns to read; the need for explicit reading instruction; underlying causes of reading difficulty; and the role of phonological awareness, phonics, word study, and fluency in reading development. Elementary teacher candidates will become familiar with strategies that promote the alphabetic principle and the development of orthographic mapping. Candidates will become familiar with concepts of print as well as word analysis skills and strategies in terms of how they relate to the development of reading. Candidates will examine methods of assessment, as well as learn strategies for instruction based upon assessment. Field experience required.

    Prerequisite: ED 2143  
    Corequisite: ED 3323  
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    ED 3563 Second Language Acquisition for Teachers

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of major theories in second language acquisition, with emphasis on contrastive principles of first and second language development. Special attention is given to second language acquisition implications in K-12 classrooms with culturally and linguistically diverse learners. Candidates are introduced to the dynamics of the educational process and the social, cultural, economic considerations, which affect second language development. Field experience required.

    Prerequisite or corequisite: ED 2143  
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    ED 3583 Curriculum and Instruction: TESOL

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Methods and materials for teaching English to non-English speakers. Classroom strategies are addressed for teaching functional English to learners of all ages. The unique characteristics and needs of the K-12 program (content and language development), adult community education (literacy), and intensive English (academic) settings are analyzed. Candidates develop skills in the evaluation, selection, and implementation of appropriate ESL materials and teaching strategies. Field experience required.

    Prerequisite or corequisite: ED 2143 
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    ED 3861 Field Experience in a Multicultural Environment

    One hour (On Campus)
    An opportunity to develop practical teaching skills while working with children in another culture. Under the direction of the program supervisor, participants plan and implement teaching strategies in various subject areas including science, math, literacy, sports, music, and basic tenets of Christianity. Students participate in a formal presentation of the program, maintain a daily log, and develop a paper outlining what they have learned. One credit hour is earned for each three weeks of participation.

    Offered on campus Summer semester
  
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    ED 3862 Field Experience in a Multicultural Environment

    Two hours (On Campus)
    An opportunity to develop practical teaching skills while working with children in another culture. Under the direction of the program supervisor, participants plan and implement teaching strategies in various subject areas including science, math, literacy, sports, music, and basic tenets of Christianity. Students participate in a formal presentation of the program, maintain a daily log, and develop a paper outlining what they have learned. One credit hour is earned for each three weeks of participation.

    Offered on campus Summer semester
  
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    ED 3903 Teaching in the Christian School

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An introduction to the history, philosophy, organization, and function of private Christian schools. The various curricular plans and methods are considered. Meets ACSI certification requirements.

    Prerequisite: ED 2143 
    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    ED 4272 Teaching Elementary Social Studies

    Two hours (On Campus)
    Elementary candidates will study methods and materials for teaching elementary social studies content through Arkansas State Social Studies Standards. Emphasis will be placed on how an elementary classroom teacher integrates social studies instruction content throughout the school day. Candidates will learn through social studies lenses that begin by focusing on the narrower and more manageable viewpoint of self and personal experience, expanding to community, state, nation, and ultimately to a broader world view. An embedded field experience is required.

    Prerequisites: ED 3323  and ED 3333  
    Corequisites: ED 4353 , ED 4363 , ED 4383 , and register for Praxis II Elementary Content Knowledge
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    ED 4353 Teaching Elementary Writing and Children’s Lit (Blk 2)

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Elementary candidates will develop the knowledge, skills, and qualities of the writing processes, genres, and pedagogy. They will also examine the genres of children’s literature while extending pedagogical understanding of K-6 students’ comprehension development. Embedded field experience required.  

    Prerequisite: ED 3333  
    Corequisites: ED 4272 , ED 4363 , ED 4383 , and register for Praxis II Elementary Content Knowledge
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    ED 4363 Teaching Elementary Science (Blk 2)

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Methods and materials for teaching science to diverse K-6 students through inquiry-based lesson planning and Next Generation Science standards. Candidates will use science technology and tools in elementary classrooms through embedded field experiences.

    Prerequisites: GSC 1043  and GSC 1053  
    Corequisites: ED 4272 , ED 4353 , and ED 4383  
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    ED 4383 Teaching Elementary Mathematics (Blk 2)

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Elementary candidates will study methods and materials for teaching mathematics (based upon NCTM standards) to diverse students. Emphasis is placed on constructive principles and the use of mathematics manipulatives, as well as CGI methodology. Embedded field experience required.

    Prerequisites: ED 2143 , MTH 2143 , and MTH 2183  
    Corequisites:  ED 4272 ED 4353 , and ED 4363 
    Prerequisite or corequisite: taking Praxis II ECE Content Knowledge
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    ED 4643 Secondary Pedagogy

    Three hours (On Campus)
    General methods of teaching which build upon Danielson’s Frameworks for Teaching including writing objectives and lesson plans, teaching techniques, models of teaching, learning theories, motivation, classroom management, and differentiated instruction as applied to secondary grades.  A consideration of the secondary school curriculum for applicable content areas, teaching strategies, and utilization of instructional materials.  Reviewing the content area curriculum as it relates to learning and development, differences in learning styles, critical thinking, problem solving and performance skills, active learning and motivation, inquiry collaboration, supportive classroom interaction, reflection, professional growth and professional leadership.  Embedded field experience/field assignments with secondary content experts is required.

    Prerequisites: ED 2713  and ED 3153  
    Offered on campus Spring semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    ED 4850 Internship: Elementary Education

    Fourteen hours (On Campus)
    Interns are assigned to primary school(s) full-time to work under the joint supervision of an experienced classroom teacher and a university faculty member. Approved formal admission to program required. 3rd Diversity Placement option is available and must be planned with PDS Director and Chair, Department of Teacher Education. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisites: ED 2713 , ED 3323 , ED 3333 ED 4353 , senior standing, and verification of having passed Praxis II Content Knowledge
    Corequisite: ED 4851  
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    ED 4851 Seminar: Elementary Education

    One hour (On Campus)
    Discussion of problems and concerns encountered during Internship. Designed to bring professional theory and practice into a working perspective. Includes basic concepts of classroom management, safety, legal and ethical issues affecting teaching, working with parents, portfolio assessment, and cultural diversity.

    Corequisite: ED 4850 
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    ED 4880 Internship: Secondary

    Fourteen hours (On Campus)
    Interns are assigned to a secondary school full-time, to work under the joint supervision of an experienced classroom teacher and a university faculty member. Approved formal admission to program required. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisites: ED 2713 , ED 3153 , senior standing, verification of having passed Content Knowledge component of Praxis II, Curriculum and Instruction course for teaching field, and any endorsement prerequisites
    Corequisite: ED 4881  
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    ED 4881 Seminar: Secondary

    One hour (On Campus)
    Discussion of problems and concerns encountered during Internship. Designed to bring professional theory and practice into a working perspective. Includes basic concepts of classroom management, safety, legal and ethical issues affecting teaching, working with parents, portfolio assessment, and cultural diversity.

    Corequisite: ED 4880 
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    ED 4890 Internship: K-12

    Fourteen hours (On Campus)
    Interns are assigned to elementary and secondary schools full-time, to work under the joint supervision of experienced classroom teachers and a university faculty member. Approved formal admission to program required. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisites: senior standing, verification of having passed Content Knowledge component of Praxis II, ED 2713 , and Curriculum and Instruction course for teaching field
    Corequisite: ED 4891 
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    ED 4891 Seminar: K-12

    One hour (On Campus)
    Discussion of problems and concerns encountered during Internship. Designed to bring professional theory and practice into a working perspective. Includes basic concepts of classroom management, safety, legal and ethical issues, affective teaching, working with parents, portfolio assessment, current school issues, and cultural diversity.

    Corequisite: ED 4890 
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    ED 4901 Selected Topics

    One hour (On Campus)
    An intensive study of a selected area of the school curriculum designed to meet the particular needs of pre-service and in-service teachers or administrators. Specific subtitles may be added.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    ED 4902 Selected Topics

    Two hours (On Campus)
    An intensive study of a selected area of the school curriculum designed to meet the particular needs of pre-service and in-service teachers or administrators. Specific subtitles may be added.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    ED 4903 Selected Topics

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An intensive study of a selected area of the school curriculum designed to meet the particular needs of pre-service and in-service teachers or administrators. Specific subtitles may be added.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    ED 4911 School Experience

    One hour (On Campus)
    Weekly field experience based on teaching needs determined during internship.

    Prerequisites for Secondary Education majors: ED 4880  and ED 4881 
    Prerequisites for Early Education majors: ED 4850  and ED 4851 
    Prerequisites for Music Education majors: ED 4890  and ED 4891  
    Corequisite for all majors: ED 4912  
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    ED 4912 Education Capstone

    Two hours (On Campus)
    Based on internship experiences and understandings, an examination of factors affecting student learning and the culture of schools. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisites for Secondary Education majors: ED 4880  and ED 4881 
    Prerequisites for Early Education majors: ED 4850  and ED 4851 
    Prerequisites for Music Education majors: ED 4890  and ED 4891  
    Corequisite for all majors: ED 4911  
    Offered on campus Spring semester

Electrical Engineering

  
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    EE 2213 Digital Electronics

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This course introduces digital circuit analysis and design. Topics include combinational logic circuits, sequential logic circuits, and circuits containing integrated circuits. The course a significant design component. Two hours lecture-discussion and a two-hour laboratory per week. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisites: CS 1113  and EN 1112  
    Corequisite: EE 2213L
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    EE 2223 Electrical Circuits

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An introductory course in electrical circuits and electronics. Topics include basic circuit analysis, electric power, and semiconductor devices such as diodes, rectifiers, and operational amplifiers. Two hours lecture-discussion per week and one three-hour laboratory per week. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: EN 1323  
    Corequisite: EE 2223L
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    EE 3123 Embedded Systems

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An introduction to the design of embedded systems including their hardware and software architectures, design methodologies and tools, and communication protocols. Three hours lecture-discussion per week. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: CS 1113  
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    EE 3173 Renewable Energy/Electric Power Engineering

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An introductory course to renewable energy (RE) power systems. This course focuses on photovoltaics (PV) and wind power systems and introduces quantitative analysis methodologies and software for estimating the output electric power of RE systems. Topics include off-grid and grid-connected PV/wind power systems, energy efficiency, energy storage, microgrids, and smart grids. Three hours lecture-discussion per week. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: EE 2223 
    Offered on campus Spring semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    EE 3313 Electronics

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of the analysis and design of electronic circuits using BJTs and MOSFETs. Topics include bipolar and MOS transistor physics, bipolar and CMOS amplifiers, and frequency response. This course also introduces power electronics, which includes DC-DC converters and designing a printed circuit board (PCB). Two hours lecture-discussion and one three-hour laboratory per week. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: EE 2223  
    Corequisite: EE 3313L
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    EE 3323 Digital Systems

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A continuation from EE 2213  of the design and analysis of digital systems with particular emphasis in one or more areas of application. Two hours lecture-discussion and one two-hour laboratory per week. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisites: EE 2213  and EE 2223  
    Corequisite: EE 3323L
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    EE 3343 Power Systems

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An introductory course to power system engineering. A basic theory of power system analysis/design and power simulation software are covered. Topics include power transformers, transmission lines, power flows, symmetrical components and power system controls.

    Prerequisite: EE 2223  
    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    EE 3423 Signal Processing

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This course provides an introductory survey of topics relevant to modern digital signal processing including sampling, quantization, aliasing, and signal reconstruction; discrete-time signals, systems, and transforms; digital filter design; and considerations for hardware implementation.  Lectures are supplemented with several research and design projects. Two hours lecture-discussion and a two-hour laboratory per week. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: EN 3413  
    Corequisite: EE 3423L
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    EE 3501 Selected Topics

    One hour (On Campus)
    A study of a special area of electrical engineering such as computer design, microprocessor applications, electric motor design, advanced logic design, digital filters, computer systems, digital control, or direct energy converters. May also be used as internship credit or independent study.

    Prerequisite: TBD according to topic
    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    EE 3502 Selected Topics

    Two hours (On Campus)
    A study of a special area of electrical engineering such as computer design, microprocessor applications, electric motor design, advanced logic design, digital filters, computer systems, digital control, or direct energy converters. May also be used as internship credit or independent study.

    Prerequisite: TBD according to topic
    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    EE 3503 Selected Topics

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of a special area of electrical engineering such as computer design, microprocessor applications, electric motor design, advanced logic design, digital filters, computer systems, digital control, or direct energy converters. May also be used as internship credit or independent study.

    Prerequisite: TBD according to topic
    Corequisite: EE 3503L
    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    EE 4123 Electromagnetics

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This course provides a systematic study of electromagnetics as encapsulated by Maxwell’s equations. Students will apply Maxwell’s equations to solve a variety of problems involving static and dynamic electric and magnetic fields. Practical applications covered include the design and analysis of transmission lines, matching networks, waveguides, and fiber optic communications networks. Three hours lecture-discussion per week. Same as PHY 4123 

    Prerequisites: MTH 2123  and PHY 2124  
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    EE 4413 Digital Communications Theory

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Study of digital communications systems may include such topics as QAM, FSK, CPM, M-ary, PSK, ISI, coding theory, or correction theory/coding. Lab implements various communications in digital form. Two hours lecture-discussion and one two-hour laboratory per week. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: EE 3423  
    Corequisite: EE 4413L
    Offered on campus Spring semester

English

  
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    EGL 1003 Basic Writing

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Basic Writing is a course designed for students who need to improve written communication prior to taking the Core Curriculum requirement EGL 1013 . This course equips students with a firm knowledge of the fundamentals of composition, standard English grammar, punctuation, and style. The course develops college-level reading, writing, and thinking skills; practical writing skills such as generating and focusing ideas for essays, composing drafts, and polishing (revising and editing) drafts; critical reading skills such as annotating, summarizing, responding, discussing, and synthesizing assigned readings; and critical thinking skills such as analysis; argumentation, and persuasion. Graded ‘S’ or ‘U’.

    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    EGL 1013 English I: Composition

    Three hours (On Campus and Online)
    An introduction to and practice in college writing in all its variety: from personal reflections to arguments and research-supported writing. A total of twenty pages of writing is required, including a short research paper.

    Prerequisite: either a minimum ACT English score of 19, or minimum SAT verbal score of 500, or CLT grammar/writing score of at least 32, or EGL 1003, or LS 1193.
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
    Offered online Fall A and Spring A terms

  
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    EGL 1023 English II: Literary Analysis and Research

    Three hours (On Campus and Online)
    An introduction to the analysis of literary texts through reading and researching a selection of short stories, poems, dramas, and novels. In addition to essays of analysis of such works, a research paper is required.

    Prerequisite: EGL 1013  or EGL 1083 
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
    Offered online Fall B and Spring B terms

  
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    EGL 1083 Honors: English I: Composition

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A course which has as its thematic core the ethnographical study of local cultures. Focus is on primary and secondary research methods, problem solving, and writing skills. Methods include experiential, reflective, integrative, and collaborative learning, and teaching by way of field experiences, group projects, interviews, guest speakers, and seminar-type participation.

    Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program or Honors Committee approval
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    EGL 1093 Honors: English II: Literary Analysis and Research

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An introduction to the analysis of literary texts, including poetry, drama, short fiction, and the novel. Methods may include collaborative learning, field experience, group projects, guest speakers, and seminar-type participation. Assignments will include analysis and response to literary texts and a short documented scholarly research paper, leading up to a longer research project in which the student works with a selected text, the author of that text, and secondary sources to analyze the production of texts in context.

    Prerequisites: admission to Honors Program or Honors Committee approval and EGL 1013  or EGL 1083 
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    EGL 1222 Introduction to English Studies

    Two hours (On Campus)
    A seminar that explores the disciplines of language and literature, introduces students to departmental faculty and to graduates in the discipline, and prepares students for their work at JBU and for the decisions they will make regarding the professional world.

    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    EGL 2243 Young Adult Literature

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An introduction to young adult literature as a genre, including an introduction to young adult literature as an academic field of study. Course readings will feature contemporary young adult literature. Assignments may include short literary analyses and a larger research paper. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite: EGL 1023  or EGL 1093  
    Offered on campus Spring semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    EGL 2273 Introduction to Creative Writing

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This course will provide a forum for beginning writers to acquaint themselves with and explore the conventions of poetry, short fiction, and creative nonfiction. Students will read widely and write extensively, learning to appreciate the creative process and developing a vocabulary for the craft. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    EGL 2393 Advanced Composition

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An advanced course in composition for English and Education majors in which rhetorical skills are developed and refined in the practice of writing thesis-driven literary analyses and researched arguments in MLA format. Multiple stages of revision through group work and peer review are a key component of the course.

    Prerequisite: EGL 1023  or EGL 1093 
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    EGL 2483 Selected Topics in Genre: Fiction, Poetry, Nonfiction, and Drama

    Three hours (On Campus)
    In-depth study of a literary topic of interest in a given genre or subgenre. Topics vary each semester and might include such courses as C.S. Lewis and the Inklings, Detective Fiction, and the Poetry of War but will include focus on genotypical elements of the literature under discussion. May be repeated for credit when content differs. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite: EGL 1023  or EGL 1093 
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    EGL 3003 Masterpieces of Literature

    Three hours (On Campus and Online)
    An exploration of texts from ancient to modern world literature in drama, prose and poetry. Authors may include Homer, Sophocles, Dante, Shakespeare, Voltaire, Dostoevsky and Kafka. Reflective and analytical essays are required. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite: EGL 1023  or EGL 1093  
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
    Offered online Fall B and Spring B terms

  
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    EGL 3273 British Literature 1

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of early English literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the seventeenth century.  Readings may range from the poetry of Beowulf or Sir Gawain and the Green Knight ​to the works of Chaucer, Malory, Spenser, Sidney, and Shakespeare. Some readings introduce students to broad concepts in the history of the English language. A scholarly paper is required. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum. 

    Prerequisite: EGL 1023  or EGL 1093 
    Offered on campus Fall semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    EGL 3283 British Literature 2

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of English literature from the 18th and 19th centuries. Works may include novels by Defoe, Austen, Bronte, and Dickens; Romantic and mid-late Victorian poetry; and a Wilde play. Readings will be interspersed with discussions on Romanticism, the British Empire and colonialism, women’s rights, and the evolution versus faith debate. A scholarly paper is required. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum. ​

    Prerequisite: EGL 1023  or EGL 1093 
    Offered on campus Spring semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    EGL 3321 Writing Center Practicum

    One hour (On Campus)
    Experience in Writing Center methods through participant-observation, readings, and periodic staff meetings. Three hours of tutoring (peer reviews and grammar advice on student writing) each week and a weekly memo are required, plus web reports on each client served. May be repeated for credit when content differs.

    Prerequisite: EGL 2393  
    Prerequisite or corequisite: EGL 3363  
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    EGL 3340 Publishing Practicum

    No credit (On Campus)
    Students gain hands-on experience in the publishing world by working in teams on a real world publishing project for which they design, write, interact with a publisher and revise according to publisher feedback. At the end of the course, projects are officially published and students have a real world publication for their resumes. May be repeated.

    Prerequisite or corequisite: COR 1002 
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    EGL 3341 Publishing Practicum

    One hour (On Campus)
    Students gain hands-on experience in publishing through the production of John Brown University’s yearly literary and visual arts journal, Shards of Light. Under the supervision of a faculty sponsor, students will serve as the journal’s staff and oversee all parts of the publication process: solicitation, selection, revision, and copyediting of submissions; advertising and distribution; and general problem-solving. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisite or corequisite: COR 1002 
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    EGL 3363 Advanced English Grammar

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An analytically and pedagogically focused study of English grammar and an introduction to the history of the English language.

    Prerequisite: EGL 2393 
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    EGL 3413 American Literature

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This course introduces the student to major and minor American writers from colonial times through the middle of the twentieth century (e.g. Bradstreet, Douglass, Melville, Twain, Baldwin). Students will be introduced to writing and research strategies regarding literary analysis. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum. 

    Prerequisite: EGL 1023  or EGL 1093 
    Offered on campus Fall semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    EGL 3713 Literary Theory

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of the primary texts of literary criticism and aesthetics from Plato to the recent theorists, including Greenblatt, Derrida, Fish, and Foucault. Focuses on developing knowledge and application of the various ideas from the different schools of thought. A scholarly project -class presentation and paper- involving application of theories is required. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisites: EGL 1023  or EGL 1093  and one upper-level literature course
    Offered on campus Fall semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    EGL 3991 Internship

    One hour (On Campus)
    Practical experience writing outside of the classroom in a professional setting. Interns have worked for non-profits, publishing houses, churches, and small businesses. Enrollment is limited to English majors. Students will keep a journal of their experiences and turn in a reflective essay at the end of the semester. Each semester hour represents 40 hours of service.

    Prerequisites: sophomore standing and a 3.0 major GPA
    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    EGL 3992 Internship

    Two hours (On Campus)
    Practical experience writing outside of the classroom in a professional setting. Interns have worked for non-profits, publishing houses, churches, and small businesses. Enrollment is limited to English majors. Students will keep a journal of their experiences and turn in a reflective essay at the end of the semester. Each semester hour represents 40 hours of service.

    Prerequisites: sophomore standing and a 3.0 major GPA
    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    EGL 3993 Internship

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Practical experience writing outside of the classroom in a professional setting. Interns have worked for non-profits, publishing houses, churches, and small businesses. Enrollment is limited to English majors. Students will keep a journal of their experiences and turn in a reflective essay at the end of the semester. Each semester hour represents 40 hours of service.

    Prerequisites: sophomore standing and a 3.0 major GPA
    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    EGL 4473 Creative Writing Workshop: Selected Genres

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Study of and practice in a designated genre or subgenre of creative writing, such as poetry, fiction, nonfiction, or writing from faith. Students submit original work for class critique. Significant writing, reading, and participation are required. May be repeated for credit in a different genre/subgenre. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite: EGL 2273  
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    EGL 4611 Independent Study/Research

    One hour (On Campus)
    Independent study supervised by a member of the English faculty. A scholarly paper and/or a significant research project is required.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    EGL 4612 Independent Study/Research

    Two hours (On Campus)
    Independent study supervised by a member of the English faculty. A scholarly paper and/or a significant research project is required.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    EGL 4613 Independent Study/Research

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Independent study supervised by a member of the English faculty. A scholarly paper and/or a significant research project is required.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    EGL 4881 English Capstone

    One hour (On Campus)
    The English Capstone course will assess all Student Learning Outcomes for the English Major (writing and literature emphasis). This course will ask students to complete a standardized exam to assess “a high level of Understanding of the Field” of English literature; to construct a portfolio that demonstrates Creative or Critical Thinking, Independent Research, Improvement in Writing and Expression of Ideas, and an understanding of Christian Perspectives in literature; and to write several reflective essays.

    Prerequisite: senior standing
    Offered on campus Spring semester

Engineering

  
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    EN 1112 Introduction to Engineering and Computer Science

    Two hours (On Campus)
    The first course in engineering and computer science involving design concepts and processes. Two hours lecture-discussion per week. Includes an electrical/mechanical/programming design project. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    EN 1121 Production Techniques Laboratory

    One hour (On Campus)
    Basic training in the areas of welding, metal fabrication and machine tools. Two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    EN 1223 Concepts in Mechanical Engineering

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An introduction to the Mechanical Engineering profession. The course will provide an overview of forces in structures, engineering materials, fluid mechanics, thermal and energy systems, and power transmission. Two hours lecture-discussion and one two-hour laboratory per week. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: MTH 1134  
    Corequisite: EN 1223L
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    EN 1323 Concepts in Electrical Engineering

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An introduction to electrical circuits: Ohm’s Law, Kirchoff’s Laws, Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits, superposition, resistors, capacitors and inductors. Two hours lecture-discussion and one two-hour laboratory per week. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: MTH 1134  
    Corequisite: EN 1323L
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    EN 2323 Engineering Economics

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of economics as applied to engineering decision making. Consideration is given to financial decision making, comparisons of costing, and payback schemes. The context is a free enterprise system, subject to government regulation and investment capitalization. Three hours lecture-discussion per week. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    EN 3222 Collaborative Design Lab

    Two hours (On Campus)
    Student works on design projects in a team context. Four hours laboratory per week. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisites: either CS 3423 , or both EE 2223  and ME 3113 
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    EN 3413 Linear Signals and Systems

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This course provides a systematic introduction to continuous-time signals and systems with a focus on linear, time-invariant systems. The course begins by developing the necessary mathematical machinery to describe and analyze continuous-time signals. Then, systems are considered including their description using standard models, their properties, and how they respond to various input signals. The course culminates with a study of the Fourier transform and how Fourier techniques can be used to describe and analyze signals and systems in terms of frequency. These topics are widely applicable across many engineering disciplines. Applications include the analysis of vibrations in mechanical systems (e.g., jet engines) and the analysis of electrical signals (e.g., in communications). This course provides the mathematical foundation for further study of control theory and signal processing. Two hours lecture-discussion and one three-hour laboratory per week. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisites: MTH 2114  and CS 1113
    Corequisite: EN 3413L
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    EN 3501 Selected Topics

    One hour (On Campus)
    A study of a special area of engineering. May also be used as internship credit or independent study.

    Prerequisite: TBD according to topic
    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    EN 3502 Selected Topics

    Two hours (On Campus)
    A study of a special area of engineering. May also be used as internship credit or independent study.

    Prerequisite: TBD according to topic
    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    EN 3503 Selected Topics

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of a special area of engineering. May also be used as internship credit or independent study. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: TBD according to topic
    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    EN 3513 International Problem Solving

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An opportunity for students to acquire the knowledge, ability, and predisposition to work effectively with people from other cultures who define problems differently than they do. Through course instruction and interactions, students examine the historical, social, cultural, religious, political, and value systems that impact how people approach problems differently, and are prepared to work in multicultural, diverse professions. Meets the Intercultural Engagement requirement of the Core Curriculum. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: EGL 1013  or EGL 1083 
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    EN 3613 Biomedical Engineering Applications 1

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of applications of engineering in the biomedical field. Topics covered include medical device regulations, biomechanics, biomaterials and biocompatibility, and bioinstrumentation. The course will cover background in anatomy and physiology of specific applications, the use of engineering principles in the design of medical devices as well as recent advances in preclinical medical research. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisites: EE 2223  and ME 3113 
    Offered on campus Fall semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    EN 3623 Biomedical Engineering Applications 2

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Further study of applications of engineering in the biomedical field. Topics covered include biomedical imaging, tissue engineering, biomolecular techniques, and biomedical modeling. The course will cover background in anatomy and physiology of specific applications, the use of engineering principles in the design of medical devices as well as recent advances in preclinical medical research. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisites: EE 2223  and ME 3113 
    Offered on campus Fall semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    EN 3713 Robotics

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This course provides an introductory survey of fundamental topics for robotic mechanisms including mechanics, planning, and other selected topics. The course begins with an overview of configuration space and rigid-body motion. These topics provide the necessary mathematical framework for what follows: forward kinematics (how joint positions determine end-effector position and orientation), velocity kinematics and statics, and inverse kinematics (determining joint positions to achieve the desired end-effector configuration). The course concludes with selected topics based on student interest which may include kinematics of closed chains, dynamics of open chains, trajectory generation, motion planning, robot control, grasping and manipulation, and/or wheeled mobile robots. The course contains a practical project. Three hours lecture-discussion. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisites: CS 1113  and either MTH 1153  or MTH 2114 
    Offered on campus Spring semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    EN 4113 Engineering Design I

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of specifications, feasibility, modeling, optimization methods, elements of professionalism and economic analysis. Initiation of the senior design project with written and oral reporting of preliminary work. Three hours lecture-discussion per week. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: EN 3222  
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    EN 4123 Engineering Design II

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A capstone course to integrate previous engineering learning experiences in problem formulation and solution. Includes the completion of the major design project initiated in Engineering Design I, with written and oral reporting of the work. Involves supervision of freshman design students. Three hours lecture-discussion per week. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: EN 4113 
    Offered on campus Spring semester
 

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