Aug 14, 2022  
Undergraduate Catalog 2021-2022 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2021-2022 Archived Catalog

Course Descriptions


Course offerings are numbered utilizing four digits, the first indicating college year and the last the number of semester hours credit.

Courses numbered 0001 to 0999 are considered remedial; hours do not count toward minimum requirements for graduation.

Courses numbered 3001 to 4999 fulfill requirements for upper-division credits. Most of these courses have specified prerequisites.

Courses numbered 5000 to 8999 fulfill requirements for graduate credit. Most of these courses have specified prerequisites.

A prerequisite course must have been completed with an acceptable passing grade before enrollment in the given course is permitted.

A corequisite is a course in which a student must be enrolled and satisfactorily participating concurrently with the given course.

 

Engineering

  
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    EN 4323 Control Systems

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This course explores the modeling, analysis and design of linear time-invariant control systems. Topics include stability, transient responses, steady-state errors and the design of compensators and controllers. Two hours lecture-discussion and one two-hour laboratory per week. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisites: EE 2223  and EN 3413  
    Corequisite: EN 4323L
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    EN 4403 Engineering Management

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of elements and process of engineering project management covering applicable subjects such as managerial processes, organizational behavior issues, project and task scheduling, cost estimating/ evaluation/control, critical path evaluations, resource allocation, integrated tracking and control systems, risk analysis, problem identification, recovery processes and techniques, and decision theory. Three hours lecture-discussion per week.

    Prerequisite: EN 2323  
    Offered on campus upon sufficient request

Entrepreneurship and Innovation

  
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    ENT 2013 Tools and Methods for Innovation

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A foundational course introducing key concepts driving entrepreneurship as well as the methods and tools within the field of entrepreneurship including business model innovation, design thinking, customer development, prototyping, experimenting, branding, and organizational dynamics of innovation. 

    Offered on campus Fall semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    ENT 2023 Building Innovative Teams & Cultures

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A course in which students explore, experience and practice the attributes of high performing, innovative teams. It includes a study of innovation processes, methodologies and practices as well as personal assessment and content focused on a people/culture strategy for entrepreneurs and innovation leaders.

    Offered on campus Spring semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    ENT 3013 New Venture Financial Management

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A finance and accounting course which provides instruction concerning forecasting for a new venture, effectively managing cash flow in an emerging business, sources of financing (VC, bootstrapping, crowdfunding, etc.), company valuation, and exit planning.

    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    ENT 4113 Market Discovery and Validation

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Prepares students to identify new opportunities, recognize and prioritize risks, and validate ideas with customers in the market. Students bring ideas and instructor solicits new business ideas from the community. This course is dedicated to rapid research on ideas.

    Prerequisite: ENT 2013  
    Offered on campus Fall semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    ENT 4993 Innovation Launch Lab

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A capstone course in which students take business ideas, develop prototypes, and design experiments for the next phase of validation. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: senior standing
    Offered on campus Fall semester

Family and Human Services

  
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    FAM 2143 Family Science and Self

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An introduction to the field of family science and its associated helping professions, with a particular focus on better understanding how an individual is shaped by interpersonal relationships, dynamics, and interactions. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    FAM 2313 Professional Ethics and Practice

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This course will provide students with the ability to critically examine ethical questions and issues as they relate to the helping professions. Students will learn to evaluate, differentiate, and apply diverse approaches to ethical issues and dilemmas within the field of family science.

    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    FAM 2413 Developmental Psychology

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development of the human from conception through adulthood. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum. Same as PSY 2413 

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    FAM 2633 Marriage and Family Living

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of contemporary marital and family issues in light of a theological understanding of family relationships and responsibilities. Family lifespan issues and parent education issues include singleness, courtship, child-rearing practices and effects through developmental stages, and factors known to affect family health. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum. 

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    FAM 3223 Principles of Effective Parenting

    Three hours (On Campus)
    The course focuses on principles of effective parenting including theoretical approaches to understanding parent/child relations, parenting styles, the etiology of child behaviors, and mechanisms of behavior change. Various family structures and interactions over the family lifespan are considered. The course will also explore biblical and theological principles of parenting. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite: sophomore standing
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    FAM 3243 Human Sexuality

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of normal sexual development throughout the lifespan, considered from physical, social, spiritual, moral, and theological vantage points. By helping students understand typical expectations and experiences of human sexuality, they will be able to better recognize healthy and unhealthy sexuality in themselves and others. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite: junior standing
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    FAM 3273 Introduction to Therapeutic Play

    Three hours (On Campus)
    The course provides didactic and experiential training in how to be a therapeutic agent in children’s lives by using structured therapeutic play sessions and techniques. Participants are taught basic child-centered play therapy principles and skills and will engage in observations of play therapy sessions and skill building therapeutic play sessions. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    FAM 3413 Selected Topics

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Topics chosen from a variety of subjects such as Trauma, Grief and Addictions, Working with Orphans and Vulnerable Children, Philanthropy and Grant Writing, and International Human Rights and Social Justice. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite: sophomore standing
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    FAM 4113 Intercultural Family Seminar

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This course focuses on gaining knowledge about the cultural variations of families as well as their relationship to societal institutions. The class will include both didactic and experiential elements to expand helping skills in multicultural settings. Meets the Intercultural Engagement requirement or the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum (cannot meet both core requirements).

    Prerequisite: junior standing
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    FAM 4223 Introduction to Senior Seminar

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of research for their Senior Seminar project. Course work includes development of a topic and research methodology.

    Prerequisites: FAM 2633  and junior standing
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    FAM 4253 Family Communication

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A course designed to help students become more skillful in interpersonal communication as well as facilitating communication within the premarital and family setting. Includes communication for the purpose of building intimacy and conflict resolution. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: junior standing
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    FAM 4433 Senior Seminar

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A capstone course in Family and Human Services in which students strive 1) to integrate their previous academic and internship experiences; 2) to complete a professional portfolio of their education, experiences, and work-samples; and 3) to demonstrate competence in their discipline through family life program evaluation, planning, and implementation. The senior project requires a major study and formal paper written for a professional program (secular, church, or parachurch) that provides family life education and/or services. To be taken during the student’s final semester of study.

    Prerequisites: FAM 2633  and senior standing
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    FAM 4443 Critical Concerns with Adolescents

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An examination of some of the critical issues facing parents, counselors, youth leaders, social workers, and educators by means of journal reviews, interviews, and data base searches. Students research topics such as teenage suicide, substance abuse, pregnancy and abortion, sexual/physical abuse and divorce. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite: junior standing
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    FAM 4453 Social Policy for Families and Children

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An understanding of the impact legal and policy issues have on families. Policy issues covered include Family and the Law (relating to marriage, divorce, adoption, and child protection and rights.), Family and Social Services, Family and Education, Family and the Economy, and Public Policy and the Family. Additionally, a biblical presentation of social justice is presented. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite: junior standing
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    FAM 4481 Selected Topics

    One hour (On Campus)
    Topics are chosen from areas of Family and Human Services. The student may also do independent study and research under the supervision of the instructor. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum. May be repeated for credit when content differs.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    FAM 4482 Selected Topics

    Two hours (On Campus)
    Topics are chosen from areas of Family and Human Services. The student may also do independent study and research under the supervision of the instructor. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum. May be repeated for credit when content differs.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    FAM 4483 Selected Topics

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Topics are chosen from areas of Family and Human Services. The student may also do independent study and research under the supervision of the instructor. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum. May be repeated for credit when content differs.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    FAM 4611 Internship in Family and Human Services

    One hour (On Campus)
    Practical experience working under a qualified professional in the area of Family and Human Services or family life education. Enrollment is limited to majors and minors in this field. May be repeated for credit as needed to fulfill the necessary requirements. Each semester hour represents 50 hours of service.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    FAM 4612 Internship in Family and Human Services

    Two hours (On Campus)
    Practical experience working under a qualified professional in the area of Family and Human Services or family life education. Enrollment is limited to majors and minors in this field. May be repeated for credit as needed to fulfill the necessary requirements. Each semester hour represents 50 hours of service.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    FAM 4614 Internship in Family and Human Services

    Four hours (On Campus)
    Practical experience working under a qualified professional in the area of Family and Human Services or family life education. Enrollment is limited to majors and minors in this field. May be repeated for credit as needed to fulfill the necessary requirements. Each semester hour represents 50 hours of service.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters

Finance

  
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    FIN 3003 Principles of Finance

    Three hours (On Campus and Online)
    This course presents the basic concepts and tools of contemporary finance including the role of managerial finance, the financial market environment, financial statements and ratio analysis, cash flow and financial planning, the time value of money, interest rates, bond and stock valuation, and risk and return. Emphasis is placed on practical financial problem solving using financial formulas, a calculator, and Excel.

    Prerequisite: ATG 1163  or ATG 2173  
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
    Offered online Spring B term

  
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    FIN 3063 Investments

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A survey course that analyzes, measures, and values various investment instruments and their derivatives while also exploring the theories, strategies, accounting recognition, tax implications, and risk factors associated with investment activity.

    Prerequisites: FIN 3003  and either ATG 1163 , ATG 2173 , or ATG 3153  
    Offered on campus Fall semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    FIN 3103 Personal Financial Planning

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This course is an introduction to the fundamental issues of personal financial planning from a professional perspective. The class is designed to provide students with an understanding of the financial planning process, money management and investments, the economic environment, risk management, the legal environment, and institutional concepts to advise individuals, families, and small businesses in achieving their financial goals.

    Prerequisite: FIN 3003  
    Offered on campus Spring semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    FIN 4131 Selected Topics

    One hour (On Campus)
    A course offering students opportunities to study subjects of special interest.  May be offered on a group basis in a classroom setting or as independent study under faculty supervision.

    Prerequisite: junior standing
    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    FIN 4132 Selected Topics

    Two hours (On Campus)
    A course offering students opportunities to study subjects of special interest.  May be offered on a group basis in a classroom setting or as independent study under faculty supervision.

    Prerequisite: junior standing
    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    FIN 4133 Selected Topics

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A course offering students opportunities to study subjects of special interest.  May be offered on a group basis in a classroom setting or as independent study under faculty supervision.

    Prerequisite: junior standing
    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    FIN 4233 Real Estate Finance

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A broad overview of real estate finance and investment focused on valuation, return, and risk assessment of unique categories of real estate including residential, commercial, industrial, and unimproved land. The course will also consider strategic aspects of investments in real estate such as entity structure, tax implications, income production, and capital accumulation.  

    Prerequisite: FIN 3003 
    Offered on campus Spring semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    FIN 4283 Intermediate Corporate Finance

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Builds on finance theory, methods, and applications of corporate finance with emphasis on the development of problem solving skills for the business manager including risk management and analyzing the international financial environment. 

    Prerequisites: FIN 3003  and either ATG 1163 , ATG 2173,  or ATG 3153  
    Offered on campus Fall semester (odd-numbered years)

General Science

  
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    GSC 1023 Physical Science

    Three hours (On Campus and Online)


    Selected and coherent topics in the sciences of physics, chemistry, and earth science. An evaluation of the scientific method and the contributions of the theories and facts of science to society are emphasized so that students have sufficient information to evaluate arguments using scientific justification. Three hours lecture-discussion-demonstration per week. Meets the non-lab Natural Science requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite: minimum ACT math score of 19, or minimum SAT math score of 510, or CLT math score of at least18, or MTH 0153  

     
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
    Offered online Spring A and Summer A terms

  
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    GSC 1033 Astronomy

    Three hours (On Campus)


    A general education course consisting of the study of the basic concepts in astronomy and space science including a study of Newtonian mechanics, Kepler’s laws, solar phenomenon, the near-earth space environment, stellar evolution, classification and spectra, types of galaxies, and cosmology. Meets the non-lab Natural Science requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite: minimum ACT math score of 19, or minimum SAT math score of 510, or CLT math score of  at least 18, or MTH 0153  

     
    Offered on campus Fall semester

  
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    GSC 1043 Elementary Science Content I

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Introduction to the nature of science and technology with an emphasis on concepts in biology and engineering. Designed to meet the competency requirements for teacher licensure in elementary education. Topics include the structure and organization of life (from molecules to organisms), ecosystems, heredity, evolution, engineering design, and links among engineering, technology, science, and society. Integration of the Christian faith and the life sciences and technology will also be emphasized. Lab and lecture are combined into two 2-hour class sessions per week. Elementary Education majors only. Meets the Natural Science requirement of the Core Curriculum. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    GSC 1053 Elementary Science Content II

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Introduction to physical, earth, and space sciences to meet the competency requirements for teacher licensure in elementary education. Topics include matter and its interactions, motion and stability, energy, waves and their technological applications, the Earth’s place in the universe, Earth’s systems, and the Earth and human activity. Integration of the Christian faith and the physical sciences will also be emphasized. Three hours lecture-discussion-demonstration per week. Elementary Education majors only. Meets the non-lab Natural Science requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    GSC 1143 Earth Science

    Three hours (Online)
    Introductory survey of topics in geology, astronomy, oceanology, and meteorology. Earth materials and processes of geology are emphasized. Three hours lecture-discussion-demonstration per week. Meets the non-lab Natural Science requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered online Fall B and Summer B terms

  
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    GSC 2003 Environmental Science

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This course focuses on the physical aspects of the environment in which living organisms must reside and, hopefully, thrive. Meets the non-lab Natural Science requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Spring semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    GSC 4133 Faith and Science

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A capstone course designed to assist students in developing an integrated view of faith and science. Topics are selected from fundamentals of the Christian faith, history of science, nature of science, discovering God in the physical universe, creation of life, evolution of life, science in philosophy and theology, science and culture, and images of man.

    Prerequisite: junior standing
    Offered on campus Spring semester

Honors

  
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    HON 2591 Honors: Colloquium

    One hour (On Campus)
    A course offering honor students opportunities to study subjects of special interest. 

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    HON 3111 Honors: Introduction to the Honors Capstone Project

    One hour (On Campus)
    Designed to prepare students for the Honors Capstone Project. This course will guide students in selecting a topic, conducting a literature review, finding a faculty mentor and completing the capstone proposal. May be offered on a group basis in a classroom setting or as independent study under faculty supervision. This course will normally be taken during a student’s junior year.

    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    HON 3591 Honors: Colloquium

    One hour (On Campus)
    A course offering honor students opportunities to study subjects of special interest. 

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    HON 3691 Honors: Practicum

    One hour (On Campus)
    Experiences in Honors Scholars Program Leadership such as serving on the Honors Executive Council or as an editor of a literary or research journal.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    HON 3692 Honors: Practicum

    Two hours (On Campus)
    Experiences in Honors Scholars Program Leadership such as serving on the Honors Executive Council or as an editor of a literary or research journal.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    HON 3693 Honors: Practicum

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Experiences in Honors Scholars Program Leadership such as serving on the Honors Executive Council or as an editor of a literary or research journal.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    HON 4191 Honors Capstone Project

    One hour (On Campus)
    A substantial scholarly or creative project/paper representing significant research, normally in the student’s major field. The project must be approved by the college dean (and in some cases the department chair), a faculty mentor, and the Honors Committee. Guidelines may be obtained from the Honors Scholars Office.

    Prerequisite: HON 3111  
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    HON 4192 Honors Capstone Project

    Two hours (On Campus)
    A substantial scholarly or creative project/paper representing significant research, normally in the student’s major field. The project must be approved by the college dean (and in some cases the department chair), a faculty mentor, and the Honors Committee. Guidelines may be obtained from the Honors Scholars Office.

    Prerequisite: HON 3111  
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    HON 4193 Honors Capstone Project

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A substantial scholarly or creative project/paper representing significant research, normally in the student’s major field. The project must be approved by the college dean (and in some cases the department chair), a faculty mentor, and the Honors Committee. Guidelines may be obtained from the Honors Scholars Office.

    Prerequisite: HON 3111  
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    HON 4693 Honors Class Contract

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A substantial scholarly project/paper, including significant research and/or other appropriate activities that warrant honors credit, in a non-honors upper-division class in addition to the work normally required for the course. Must be approved by the college dean, the faculty mentor, and the Honors Committee. Guidelines may be obtained from the Honors Scholars Program Blackboard site.

    Prerequisite: junior standing
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    HON 4911 Honors Co-Teaching: Readings

    One hour (On Campus)
    A teaching practicum with a master teacher as mentor. During the first semester (HON 4911, HON 4912, or HON 4913), the student is assigned readings in pedagogy and the content area, resulting in a lengthy scholarly paper that articulates a theory of teaching and presents sample lesson plans. During the second semester (HON 4921, HON 4922, or HON 4923), the upper-division student co-teaches a limited number of class sessions (up to one-third) in an introductory level class. Must be approved by the associate vice president for academic administration, the college dean, the department chair, the faculty mentor, and the Honors Committee. Guidelines may be obtained from the Honors Scholars Office. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: senior standing
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    HON 4912 Honors Co-Teaching: Readings

    Two hours (On Campus)
    A teaching practicum with a master teacher as mentor. During the first semester (HON 4911, HON 4912, or HON 4913), the student is assigned readings in pedagogy and the content area, resulting in a lengthy scholarly paper that articulates a theory of teaching and presents sample lesson plans. During the second semester (HON 4921, HON 4922, or HON 4923), the upper-division student co-teaches a limited number of class sessions (up to one-third) in an introductory level class. Must be approved by the associate vice president for academic administration, the college dean, the faculty mentor, and the Honors Committee. Guidelines may be obtained from the Honors Scholars Office.  An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: senior standing
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    HON 4913 Honors Co-Teaching: Readings

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A six-hour teaching practicum with a master teacher as mentor. During the first semester (HON 4913), the student is assigned readings in pedagogy and the content area, resulting in a lengthy scholarly paper that articulates a theory of teaching and presents sample lesson plans. During the second semester (HON 4923), the upper-division student co-teaches a limited number of class sessions (up to one-third) in an introductory level class. Must be approved by the associate vice president of academic administration, the college dean, the faculty mentor, and the Honors Committee. Guidelines may be obtained from the Honors Scholars Office. 

    Prerequisite: senior standing
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    HON 4921 Honors Co-Teaching: Classroom Practicum

    One hour (On Campus)
    A teaching practicum with a master teacher as mentor. During the first semester (HON 4911, HON 4912, or HON 4913), the student is assigned readings in pedagogy and the content area, resulting in a lengthy scholarly paper that articulates a theory of teaching and presents sample lesson plans. During the second semester (HON 4921, HON 4922, or HON 4923), the upper-division student co-teaches a limited number of class sessions (up to one-third) in an introductory level class. Must be approved by the associate vice president for academic administration, the college dean, the faculty mentor, and the Honors Committee. Guidelines may be obtained from the Honors Scholars Office. An additional fee may be associated with this course.

    Prerequisite: senior standing
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    HON 4922 Honors Co-Teaching: Classroom Practicum

    Two hours (On Campus)
    A teaching practicum with a master teacher as mentor. During the first semester (HON 4911, HON 4912, or HON 4913), the student is assigned readings in pedagogy and the content area, resulting in a lengthy scholarly paper that articulates a theory of teaching and presents sample lesson plans. During the second semester (HON 4921, HON 4922, or HON 4923), the upper-division student co-teaches a limited number of class sessions (up to one-third) in an introductory level class. Must be approved by the associate vice president for academic administration, the college dean, the faculty mentor, and the Honors Committee. Guidelines may be obtained from the Honors Scholars Office.

    Prerequisite: senior standing
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    HON 4923 Honors Co-Teaching: Classroom Practicum

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A six-hour teaching practicum with a master teacher as mentor. During the first semester (HON 4913), the student is assigned readings in pedagogy and the content area, resulting in a lengthy scholarly paper that articulates a theory of teaching and presents sample lesson plans. During the second semester (HON 4923), the upper-division student co-teaches a limited number of class sessions (up to one-third) in an introductory level class. Must be approved by the associate vice president for academic administration, the college dean, the faculty mentor, and the Honors Committee. Guidelines may be obtained from the Honors Scholars Office.

    Prerequisite: senior standing
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters

History

  
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    HST 2013 Integrated Humanities I

    Three hours (On Campus and Online)
    This interdisciplinary course explores how the humanities, through many varied types of Great Texts, examine human experiences and raise questions of enduring value and meaning. The first semester focuses on the history and literature of civilizations from the beginning of recorded history to the Renaissance. 

    Prerequisite: EGL 1013  or EGL 1083 
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
    Offered online Spring A and Summer A terms

  
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    HST 2023 Integrated Humanities II

    Three hours (On Campus and Online)
    This interdisciplinary course explores how the humanities, through many varied types of Great Texts, examine human experiences and raise questions of enduring value and meaning. The second semester focuses on the history and literature of civilizations from the Renaissance to the modern period. 

    Prerequisite: EGL 1013  or EGL 1083 
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
    Offered online Spring B and Summer B terms

  
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    HST 2083 Honors: Integrated Humanities I

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This interdisciplinary course explores how the humanities, through many varied types of Great Texts, examine human experiences and raise questions of enduring value and meaning. The first semester focuses on the history and literature of civilizations from the beginning of recorded history to the Renaissance. 

    Prerequisite: EGL 1013  or EGL 1083  
    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    HST 2093 Honors: Integrated Humanities II

    Three hours (On Campus)
    This interdisciplinary course explores how the humanities, through many varied types of Great Texts, examine human experiences and raise questions of enduring value and meaning. The second semester focuses on the history and literature of civilizations from the Renaissance to the modern period. 

    Prerequisite: EGL 1013  or EGL 1083  
    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    HST 2113 United States History to 1865

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A survey of American political, social, and economic history from the colonial era through the Civil War. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Fall semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    HST 2123 United States History since 1865

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A survey of American political, social, and economic history from the reconstruction era to the present. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Spring semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    HST 2133 Great Books in Context

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A course devoted to the study of one or more great books. The course examines the books themselves and also considers them as expressions of historical contexts. The enduring historical influence of texts may also be considered. At the professor’s discretion, the course may additionally devote time to a rudimentary study of the original language in which a great work was written. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    HST 2153 Twentieth Century World History

    Three hours (Online)
    A study of major political, economic, and military trends of the twentieth century. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered online Fall A and Spring A terms

  
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    HST 2213 Study of History

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A course that introduces students to the skills needed for historical study, as well as to historiographical topics and challenges.

    Offered on campus Fall semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    HST 2413 Arkansas History

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of the political, social, and economic development of Arkansas from the eras of exploration and early statehood to the present. Major themes include the Civil War and Reconstruction, segregation and disenfranchisement, the one-party experience, progressivism, the struggle for democracy, and civil rights. Meets state requirements for elementary and secondary teachers.

    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    HST 3233 Middle Ages

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of medieval Europe with an emphasis on the role of the Celts, Germanic tribes, and the Church in shaping medieval society, culture, and intellectual life. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Spring semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    HST 3263 Slavery and Race in American History

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of the development of American slavery in comparative context as well as the ongoing effects of slavery on American race relations. Topics include the development of the slave systems of the Atlantic world and United States and the relationship between slavery and the development of ideas of race in the U.S. Meets the Intercultural Engagement requirement or the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum (cannot meet both core requirements).

    Offered on campus Spring semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    HST 3393 Poverty and Welfare in American History

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of poverty and welfare in American history from the colonial period to the present. Particular attention is paid to the theology of poverty in the American context. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Spring semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    HST 3411 Selected Topics

    One hour (On Campus)
    Selected topics in history are considered. Examples include Renaissance Europe, American Founding, American West, and Nazi Germany. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum. May be repeated for credit when content differs.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    HST 3412 Selected Topics

    Two hours (On Campus)
    Selected topics in history are considered. Examples include Renaissance Europe, American Founding, American West, and Nazi Germany. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum. May be repeated for credit when content differs.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    HST 3413 Selected Topics

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Selected topics in history are considered. Examples include Renaissance Europe, American Founding, American West, and Nazi Germany. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum. May be repeated for credit when content differs.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    HST 3423 Leaders in History

    Three hours (Online)
    A study of leaders, well-known and lesser known, in their historical contexts. The efforts of leaders in business, politics, social and cultural movements, and warfare are examined. Consideration is given to success and failure, personality strengths and flaws, and leadership characteristics and styles. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered online Spring A and Summer B terms

  
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    HST 3433 History of the Middle East, 600-1800

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of the major political, religious, and social forces that shaped life in the Middle East from the time of Muhammad to the early modern period. Special attention is given to the development of the Islamic tradition and the interactions between Muslims, Jews, and Christians. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Fall semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    HST 3443 The Modern Middle East

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An examination of the political and social environment of the Middle East from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present. Topics that will be discussed include European colonization, the Ottoman Empire, Arab nationalism, the Arab-Israeli Conflict, the rise of the Islamist movement, and the U.S. involvement in the Gulf War. Meets the Intercultural Engagement requirement or the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum (cannot meet both core requirements).

    Offered on campus Spring semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    HST 3453 African Civilizations

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of the development of African civilizations from early history to modern times. Attention is given to Africa in the global context. Areas of inquiry include Islam in Africa, sub-Saharan societies, African kingdoms, the slave trade, colonial ideology and rule, independence movements and African nationalism, post-colonial culture and politics, inter-and intra-state conflict, and contemporary issues in Africa. Meets the Intercultural Engagement requirement or the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum (cannot meet both core requirements).​

    Offered on campus Spring semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    HST 3513 Introduction to Museum Studies

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An introduction to the educational, curatorial, exhibitions, public relations, and research missions of museums. Topics of discussion include organizational structure, curatorial management, records and material care, and the role of museums in community life.

    Offered on campus Fall semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    HST 3523 Classical World

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of the ancient Western world from the development of Greece to the fall of the Roman Empire. The military, social, and political consequences of Greek and Roman rule are considered. Meets the Arts and Humanities requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Fall semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    HST 4313 Internship in Museum Studies

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Practical experience working under the guidance of a qualified professional in a field related to museum studies. Each semester hour represents 45 hours of service.

    Prerequisite: HST 3513 
    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    HST 4511 Independent Study

    One hour (On Campus)
    Supervised study of topics of special interest to the student and professor.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    HST 4512 Independent Study

    Two hours (On Campus)
    Supervised study of topics of special interest to the student and professor.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    HST 4513 Independent Study

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Supervised study of topics of special interest to the student and professor.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    HST 4613 Seminar in History

    Three hours (On Campus)
    The course brings psychological, philosophical, and theological reflections to bear on the study of history. All students will write a sophisticated research paper between 15-25 pages in length.

    Prerequisite: junior standing
    Offered on campus Spring semester (even-numbered years)

Intercultural Studies

  
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    ICS 2113 Intercultural Communication

    Three hours (On Campus and Online)
    A study of the process of interpersonal communication in one’s own culture and the principles of effective communication within another cultural context. Attention is given to values, ethnocentricity, nonverbal communication, and change. Meets the Intercultural Engagement requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
    Offered online Fall B and Summer B terms

  
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    ICS 2123 Cultural Anthropology

    Three hours (On Campus)
    The study of culture, language, economics, kinship, marriage, gender, social control, social stratification, religion, art, and cultural change from an applied anthropological perspective using case studies. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Offered on campus Fall semester
  
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    ICS 2193 Honors: Intercultural Communication

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of the process of interpersonal communication in one’s own culture and the principles of effective communication within another cultural context. Attention is given to values, ethnocentricity, nonverbal communication and change. Meets the Intercultural Engagement requirement of the Core Curriculum. 

    Offered on campus Spring semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    ICS 3133 Qualitative Research Methods

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A study of the design and methods of the Qualitative Research paradigm, to include phenomenology, ethnography, grounded theory, narrative inquiry and case study, as well as the fieldwork methods of participant-observation, interviewing and archival research. Students will design their own original research project.

    Offered on campus Spring semester
  
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    ICS 3163 Geo-Cultural Studies

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Researching the history, geography, social structure, religious, and economic environments of specific countries to be visited by student teams.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    ICS 3171 Selected Topics

    One hour (On Campus)
    Investigation of subjects of specific interest and importance to the student preparing for specialized intercultural service. May be repeated for credit when content differs.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    ICS 3172 Selected Topics

    Two hours (On Campus)
    Investigation of subjects of specific interest and importance to the student preparing for specialized intercultural service. May be repeated for credit when content differs.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    ICS 3173 Selected Topics

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Investigation of subjects of specific interest and importance to the student preparing for specialized intercultural service. May be repeated for credit when content differs.

    Offered on campus upon sufficient request
  
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    ICS 3243 Community Development

    Three hours (On Campus)
    An introduction to the basic principles and strategies of community development. Students learn how to facilitate community development in impoverished areas in such a way that faith and appropriate technology are joined together to reduce human drudgery, to alleviate poverty, and to contribute to a deeper understanding and effective application of spiritual truths. Emphasis is placed upon the developer’s role as a facilitator of social change, the skills needed for facilitating social change, and an understanding of how communities adopt new ideas.

    Offered on campus Fall semester (even-numbered years)
  
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    ICS 3263 Theory and Practice of Appropriate Technology I

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Appropriate Technology (AT) is a study of applying technologies relevant to the context or environment in which they will be used. Emphasis is placed on applying technologies of housing and construction, energy, food production, land management, manufacturing, and health and sanitation to community development projects.

    Offered on campus Summer semester
  
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    ICS 3283 Theory and Practice of Appropriate Technology II

    Three hours (On Campus)
    Appropriate Technology (AT) is a study of applying technologies relevant to the context or environment in which they will be used. Emphasis is placed on applying technologies of housing and construction, energy, food production, land management, manufacturing, and health and sanitation to community development projects.

    Prerequisite: ICS 3263  
    Offered on campus Summer semester
  
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    ICS 4120 Intercultural Internship

    No credit (On Campus)
    An intercultural experience in which the student works with an approved mentor selected with the vocational objectives of the student in mind. A minimum of 135 hours of practical service is required. Written assignments are required, including a personal philosophy of intercultural service. Limited to Intercultural Studies majors. 

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    ICS 4123 Intercultural Internship

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A supervised intercultural experience in which the student works in a company, non-profit, or other organization with the vocational objectives of the student in mind. A minimum of 150 hours of practical service is required. A written assignment is required.

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
  
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    ICS 4133 Intercultural Leadership Skills

    Three hours (On Campus)
    A practical examination of the process of developing and maintaining effective intercultural relationships. Leadership skills, intercultural team dynamics and conflict resolution, and the servant model of leadership are considered.

    Offered on campus Fall semester (odd-numbered years)
  
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    ICS 4220 Intercultural Field Experience

    No credit (On Campus)
    A supervised immersive experience in a culture involving home stays, field research, participant-observation, and interviews. A minimum of 150 hours of immersion is required. Often completed during a semester study abroad. 

    Offered on campus Fall and Spring semesters
 

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